What is a Silent Heart Attack?

A silent heart attack symptom is different for men and women:



- In men - it is the absence of the usual sign, which is a feeling like the chest is being run over by a Mack truck.

- In women - the warning signs are much more subtle and often hard to pinpoint. They may feel fatigue when doing something that they used to do easily, such as play tennis, run to catch a train, doing usual household chores, or walk up two flights of stairs.

Sometimes it may be a feeling of mild indigestion. And contrary to the general belief it has absolutely no chest pain whatsoever.

Therefore in - both men and women - the most notable characteristic of a silent heart attack, is that it can occur without your knowledge. This condition accounts for almost 25 to 30% of the total cases.



Videopidia Animation (01:11min)

The Symptoms:

The symptoms are generally very mild, often unnoticed, and undiagnosed. This is why it is often known as a silent killer.

In general, there may be a subtle discomfort in the chest like pressure or a squeezing in the middle of the chest, and shortness of breath may be present.

These symptoms usually subside after taking some rest. Sleep disorders and increased fatigue are also two important symptoms.

This heart problem may also produce a symptom of prolonged abdominal pain in both men and women, while it can cause heartburn and moistness of skin particularly in women.

Other common symptoms are dizziness and nausea, which can also lead to vomiting.

The Risk Factors:

The people who fall under the risk zone are diabetics, individuals with heart disease, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. Other factors are smoking and obesity.

It is usually diagnosed with the help of a detailed study of the patient's medical history and ECG (electrocardiogram).

So chest pain, which is generally regarded as the most common symptom may not be present in this case.

Therefore, even the mildest symptoms of a heart symptoms should be properly checked, to avoid any serious complications.

In addition to prompt treatment, changes in the lifestyle are also essential to control the risk factors.

Therefore, regulating and monitoring diabetes and hypertension and avoiding smoking, eating a healthy diet containing fresh vegetables and fruits, regular exercise and controlling the level of blood cholesterol can be effective in warding off the risk of silent heart attacks.




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